It is the only monument that is preserved before the Reconquest. An inscription on its front façade is the only clue to date its antiquity, which is presumed at the end of 999, and according to the same inscription the architect in charge of its construction was the architect Musa Ibn Alí, commissioned by Ibn Hadidí, who would possibly be of a powerful character of the time.

The building was consecrated to Christian worship after the Reconquest, on the same day, May 25, 1085, adding the apse with a rich decoration of blind arches. The small space of the temple is divided by four columns that make up nine vaulted spaces separated by horseshoe arches. In 1900 the old mosque was declared a National Monument.

It can be visited from March 1 to October 15 from 10:00 a.m. to 6:45 p.m. And from October 16 to February 28 from 10:00 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. Monday to Friday it is closed from 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
It also closes on January 1 and December 25.